Broadway Fillmore Alive

The Online Voice of Buffalo's Historic Polonia

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The Broadway Market Needs to Take a Look at Changing its Hours

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A cursory look at some other markets around the country and I found that a lot offer later hours on all or a few days of the week and offer Sunday hours.

The Broadway Market has been open 8am-5pm six days a week (Monday-Saturday) for as long as I can remember. In this day and age, those hours just don’t cut it in retail anymore.  The market needs to adapt to the market.

The market doesn’t need to radically change its hours either.

Let’s start by having it open a few nights a week to 7pm.  The later closing will provide an extra window of time for people to shop after work or may want to zip down later.  It  makes the market more convenient and can help expand its base of year-round shoppers.

Next.

Have you been inside of a Wegmans or Tops on Sunday recently?  They are jammed packed with people shopping.  These people could be shopping at the Broadway Market.

If you take in to consideration the influx of people who come to the Broadway-Fillmore neighborhood for Sunday Mass, there is a built in customer base waiting to be tapped into.  Personally, I would love to stop in the market for some baked goods, etc. on Sunday after Mass. The Broadway Market wouldn’t have to open all day on Sundays.  A short hour schedule of 9am-2pm should suffice.

Examining its hours and changing them accordingly is an easy way for the market to try to build a larger customer base.

Old World Easter Feasting At Buffalo’s Historic Broadway Market

Butter Lambs, or Baranek wielkanocny in Polish

(Karen Seiger – Markets of  New York) I heard the stories about Buffalo’s Broadway Market from when my father-in-law was a kid. Growing up in the Polish neighborhood on the east side of town, Fred told stories of how beautiful and vibrant the market used to be in the 1930’s and ‘40’s. James used to go shopping there with his grandma, who never forgot her tote bag.

The Broadway Market opened in 1888 to serve the new wave of European immigrants coming to settle in Buffalo, NY. Generations of Buffalonians feel deep connections to this institution, especially within the Polish American community. Today, the market remains open year-round, although it is much smaller and not nearly as bustling as it used to be before the advent of suburbs and grocery stores. That is, until Easter rolls around!

Read full story on Markets of New York—>